Posts Tagged ‘Creative Commons’

So far in the series, Putting the YOU in YouTube, we’ve discussed personalizing your channel, uploading your videos, and trimming out the parts of your videos that you don’t want.  In this post, we’re going to look at using the tools within the YouTube Editor that will help you put your mark on your movies.

I’m not sure why YouTube has made it so hard to find the Editor, but they have.  You can find a link to the Editor under the Enhancements option in Video Manager, OR you can simply type in youtube.com/editor in your address bar after you’re logged in.  Once at the editor, this is what you’ll see:

Video Editor - YouTube 2013-10-02 13-48-11

 

In the Editor, you can bring videos together to make one longer video, you can apply filters to your video clips, add music, titles, and transitions, as well as insert still photos into your video.  The image below shows what each of the icons in your “Options Menu” represent.

editor tools

 

The Video Editor is very easy to use because it is a simple “Drag & Drop”.  You’ll start by dragging all of your video clips you want to include in your movie onto the row of the workspace for the videos.  To add additional video clips, drag the clips down to the workspace and “drop” it beside the clip you’ve already placed.  You can click the Creative Commons icon to access video clips that have been licensed under the Creative Commons that you’re free to use in your own videos.  If you have still images you’d like to incorporate into your video, you can click the camera icon.  You’ll then be prompted to either upload images from your computer, or you can import pictures from your Google+ account.  Once they’re displayed beside the preview pane, again, just drag and drop them where you want them to go in your video.

When you drag a video clip (or any of the other options) onto the workspace, you’ll be able to edit those clips or elements further.  Below is a screenshot of what your screen will look like when you drag a video clip onto the workspace.  Notice that you’ll have the ability to make some quick fixes which include zooming in and out, change the brightness, stabilize, rotate, etc. You can also add text to your video clips.  Be careful with this, however, because if you add text here, it will display the entire time your video clip is playing.  If you’d rather just add a title text or a “slide” of text between videos, you use the text icon from the original Editor menu.  Keep reading to learn more.  To get back to the original Editor menu, simply click in the gray area of the workspace, or click the x in the upper right-hand corner of the clip editor.

video clip options in editor

The music icon will allow you add Creative Commons music clips to your videos.  Although there is a volume bar where you can tell YouTube to favor either the sound from the original video clip or the music, the music always seems to be louder than the sound from the video.  add music in editorSo just be careful and consider which is more important, music or sound from your video.  At this point, there isn’t a way to assign music to only certain portions of your video either.  You’ll drag the music clip onto the workspace under the videos and images.  Also, there is currently no way to upload your own music files…more than likely copyright issues.

To add titles and/or transitions to your movie, you click and drag the type of title or transition you’d like onto the workspace where you want them to go.  When you drag the element down to the workspace, you’ll see a blue line appear to show you where the element will be added.  You’ll need to be careful with the titles because if the blue line highlights the entire video clip, that means that title will play the entire length of the clip.  If you only want it to show before or after the video clip or image, you’ll want the skinny blue line.  To get back to the original Editor menu, you’l usually click the x in the upper right corner.  However, for some reason, that “x” isn’t present on the transitions menu.  To get back to the Editor menu, you can click in the gray area of the workspace.

If you decide that you don’t want an element in your video after all, or any element for that matter, you can hover your mouse over that element.  A small x will appear in the upper right-hand corner of the gray bar.  Simply click the x and that element will be removed from your workspace.  You can also reorder an of the elements in your video by clicking and dragging it to where you want it to go.

Once you’re video is like you want it:  all of your video clips are in the correct order, you’ve added any desired still images, you have transitions between the elements to make it flow smoothly, and you have inserted all the necessary title slides, it’s time to publish.  Directly above the preview pane, you can rename your video, then on the right-hand side of the screen is a blue “Publish” button.  Depending on how long your video is, how many transitions you’ve included, and if you decided to include music clips, it may take your video a little while to publish.  The beauty of the Editor is that until you publish, all of your work is automatically saved.  So if you don’t have time to finish your video in one sitting, you can log out of YouTube, come back to it later, go to the editor, and all of your work is still there.  When you publish, you’ll then have a blank workspace again.

Next Steps:

Making your videos interactive (Coming soon!)

Publishing your videos on YouTube (Coming soon!)

Did you miss the first three post in the series Putting the YOU in YouTube?  Check them out!

Putting the YOU in YouTube

Uploading videos to YouTube

Trimming your videos

 

Over the past month, I’ve been writing about the issues and resources surrounding copyright in the digital classroom.  I’ve covered Fair Use, Public Domain, Creative Commons, and now we’re going to look at specific solutions to ensure copyright compliance in the digital classroom.  Below are my recommendations for creating a copyright friendly environment in your digital classroom.

Protect Yourself!google_sites_icon

Class websites can be an amazing tool for delivering content, fostering collaboration, and sharing information with parents and students.  However, many teachers (and students) will sometimes use images and content that they don’t have the right to use.  Remember that Fair Use only covers face to face instruction, so if you’re using your website to deliver instruction, you cannot claim Fair Use.  Here are my suggestions for protecting yourself with your awesome class website:

  • Password protect your website.  By password protecting your website, only your students will have access to your instruction.  I recommend using Google Sites to build your class website because you can use page level permissions to only password protect certain pages.  This will allow you to have a parent information page that is public.  Even password protected content can still be used illegally though.  An extra precaution you can take is to convert copyrighted documents to pdf files and then disable saving and printing.
  • Use Google’s Search Tools option to find images that are licensed for reuse.  When you do a Google Image search, right below the search bar, at the end of the advanced search options, it says “Search Tools”.  The fifth option is “Usage Rights”.  Choose the licensing option that fits your needs.
  • Ask permission.  In the world of email, Twitter, Facebook, and personal websites, finding people is easier than ever.  Do your due diligence to find the authors/creators of the content you wish to use on your site.
  • Link rather than embed.  I have to admit that I’m an embedder.  I’d rather have everything right on the page in one place.  However, if you haven’t obtained permission, you could be infringing on someone’s copyright.  If you link to the original source of the content, you’re safe.  Additionally, if you’re using audio or video content, make sure that it is streaming rather than downloadable.
  • Site all works that aren’t yours!  We all learned how to cite our sources in high school, and definitely in college.  Break out those rusty skills and make sure that you’re at least making an effort to give credit where credit is due.
  • Utilize Creative Commons resources.  There are a ton of great works available that people have licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons.  Flickr and CreativeCommons.org are two great places to start.

Assigning students multimedia projects, or better yet, giving them the a menu of project choices is a great way to increase engagement and motivation in your classroom.  However, sometimes students don’t take copyright into consideration when they’re choosing images and content to use in those projects.  Using the suggestions above will make them more aware of the content that they’re using.  My final suggestion for you will not only increase the relevance of what your students are doing, but the rigor as well.

SoundCloud, YouTube, and Flickr

Either set up an account with a generic username and password for your class, or have students set up their own accounts for the sites above.  SoundCloud is for sound clip storage, YouTube for video storage, and Flickr is for photographs.  Have your students create their own images, sound clips, and videos to use in their presentations and projects.  I think it would be neat to have them set up their own accounts and license their work with the CreativeCommons licensing tool.  Have them get permission from each other before using a classmate’s content in their presentations.  Doing this will allow you and your students to build a database of content to pull from when needed for websites, presentations, and multimedia projects, and will get students in the habit of seeking resources that are copyright-friendly.

creative_commons

Even on a good day, copyright is hard to understand.  There are so many rules and percentages of use to remember that even while trying to be compliant, we may make mistakes.  The availability of resources online makes that even more difficult sometimes because we think, “well if someone put it on the Internet, it must be okay to use it”.  Unfortunately, that’s just not the case.  In fact, I received a message from Pinterest letting me know that they had removed one of my pins.  It was just something that I repinned, so I wasn’t responsible, per say, but it was still removed because the copyright holder complained.  As teachers and users of online content, we’ve got to be more aware, and teach our students to be more aware, of what is right and what is wrong when it comes to using online resources.

Fortunately, Creative Commons was founded in 2001 as a way for people to license their work for certain uses or to dedicate works to the public domain for free.  Since 2001, they have worked to bring scientific research to the public with their licenses, as well as to minimize barriers for educators and students to share and reuse educational materials.  According the their website, “Creative Commons licenses, public domain tools, and supporting technologies have become the global standard for sharing across culture, education, government, science, and more.”  Thank you, Creative Commons!

So what are the Creative Commons licenses?  According to a very helpful infographic by Foter, here are the available licenses and how they’re used:

creativecommons

How To Attribute Creative Commons Photos by Foter

So basically, finding resources that have been licensed under CreativeCommons ensures that you’re using materials with permission.  I also love the fact that you and your students can license your own work for free!  If you’ve never explored the Commons, I highly suggest you check out CreativeCommons.org.  From the website, you can read about special projects they’re currently involved in, explore their Public Domain resources, and find materials that have been licensed under Creative Commons.  My challenge to you is to start creating and get your students creating, then license those creations.  Use your materials and their materials in your lessons, presentations, and projects to ensure that you are copyright compliant.

What are my favorite CreativeCommons tools?

Flickr for photos

YouTube for videos

Sound Cloud for music

Do you have “go to” Creative Commons sites?  Please share them in the comments below.  Want to learn more about copyright in the digital classroom?  Check out my other posts in this series:

Copyright in the Digital Classroom

Fair Use

Public Domain

Copyright, Class Websites, and Student Projects

Clustr Map
Google+